Raniyah Copeland, 34, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the Black AIDS Institute (BAI).   Copeland previously served as Director of Programs for BAI the organization’s chief HIV prevention and treatment expert managing all HIV treatment, prevention and community mobilization training and engagement programs including the Black Treatment Advocates Network (BTAN), the African American HIV University (AAHU), and the Greater Than AIDS campaign.

Prior to joining the staff of BAI, Copeland worked as a Crisis Case Manager at Beyond Shelter, a Reproductive Health Assistant for Planned Parenthood Pasadena, and the Executive Director of the Black Recruitment and Retention Center at the University of California, Berkeley.

She earned a Bachelor of Arts in African American Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and a Master of Public Health from Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science.

Copeland is married to Bryce Copeland, a business manager for Sony Pictures Entertainment.  They are the parents of Ahmad, 4, and Aydin, 1.  They reside in the Windsor Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.

She is a member of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., an AmeriCorp Alumni, and a Co-Founder of the African Black Coalition.  “As a Black cis-woman and mother, my intersectionality informs how I center people living with HIV, queer people, Black trans women, and folks in the Black communities who are marginalized because of who they are,” says Copeland.

Founded in 1999, as the only national HIV/AIDS think tank focused exclusively on Black communities, the Black AIDS Institute’s mission is to end the HIV/AIDS pandemic in Black communities by engaging and mobilizing traditional Black Leaders, Institutions, and individuals in efforts to confront HIV/AIDS.  The motto is “Our People, Our Problem, Our Solution!”

“We are bringing a collective of the nation’s brightest leaders who are modeling the way to end HIV in Black America through the provision of outstanding, Black-centric clinical care, and best practices shared across the country.”

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